One World Observatory, The Freedom Tower

I have written two posts earlier about the views from our apartment. Please see Beginning and The Tallest Building.

When we moved into our apartment a decade ago, there was no Freedom Tower. Memories of 9/11 still fresh.

Over the years, One World Trade Center or the Freedom Tower has become what you see below. We have seen it evolve while witnessing our own evolution. And last weekend, we visited One World Observatory at One World Trade Center.

The tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, fourth tallest in the world. A symbol of resilience, rising from the ashes. The apartment view.
That’s our apartment building. Witnessing the witnesser of the past ten years from the 102nd floor of One World Observatory.
Zoomed-in view from the ground
As expected, there were airport-like security checks.
The tunnel, en route to the Sky Pod elevator, has mock displays of the natural rock foundations of the building. The bedrock of New York City: how an ancient mountain range made its skyscrapers possible.

Sky Pod elevators. We reached the 102nd floor in 47 seconds. Inside, on our rocket ride, we experienced a three-dimensional time-lapse panorama of NYC history unfolding on three walls of the elevator cab. (Warning: The elevator ride you are about to experience utilizes large format media displays to create the illusion of dynamic motion and viewing beyond the elevator cab walls. Individuals who are sensitive to simulation experiences, or suffer from fear of heights or motion sickness are advised to either close their eyes or face the elevator doors to avoid discomfort.)
See Forever Theater. After you disembark the elevator, you walk up to a big rectangular screen where you’ll see a multi-media presentation highlighting the NYC timeline, introducing you to the observatory.

360-degree views:

East River, Brooklyn Bridge, Manhattan Bridge
Financial District, Governors Island, Brooklyn
Midtown and Uptown Manhattan
The iconic Hudson River separating New Jersey from New York City.
The Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Staten Island, and Jersey City in New Jersey.
At One Dine, One World, celebrating our son’s birthday.
Exploring the Sky Portal: a real-time perspective from HD cameras affixed to the tower’s spire, projected right at the feet.
The Buzz gives all the information you need about NYC.
Calatrava’s Bird in Flight, the WTC transportation hub that cost $4 billion.
The Oculus, the transportation hub
The West Concourse

It starts with Lines (Photo Challenge). It starts with Rivulet, too (Daily Prompt).

Elevator’s Very Known Strangers

Life in a 36-floor apartment building – where elevator’s routine – is fascinating.

Each floor has ten apartments, so roughly a total of 360 apartments. Two each on the left and the right are the four elevators in the building. Each elevator can hold up to 1500 pounds; ten people may be the limit if you average 150 pounds each; then, there are strollers, carts, luggage, and bikes guzzling up the space.

In almost a decade of living in the same building, I haven’t seen a single instance where the elevator carried more than the permitted pounds of weight. You could figure this out by looking at how cramped the lifting device is.

The elevator queue is apparently long during peak hours. After the first person in line has pushed the cream button lighting it up, the rest would – from our positions in the queue – try to read the four little screens right above the elevator doors. We’d watch the ascending or descending red digits and adjust our necks to see which elevator lands first to a creaking halt. When the screen reads 1 – and amid a collective sigh – courtesy demands that we wait for the people already in it to exit like we do on subway trains. Ninety percent of the people in line would wait for the passengers to step out while the rest might show incredible urgency.

elevator-1

Most are known strangers in the world of the elevator: you may have seen them everywhere, all these years, but recognize them only in the shaft-cage. Here are five incidents that I’ll remember for a long time:

  1. If you see someone on a particular day, it’s unlikely that you’ll see the same person a second time in the same elevator. A ten-year-old boy was in the elevator for a while, cruising up and down in semi-peak hour. A lot of known strangers saw him. I’d seen him on my way to the grocery store. When I returned, he was standing at that very corner, staring at nothing. We see this kind of behavior on light rail trains, where people buy a $3 ticket to use the transport for the duration of its two-hour validity. As I was exiting at 6th, I smiled at him, and he answered a question I’d never asked: “This is my way of busting school stress.”
  1. When there was a line of about ten people at 6 pm, I saw this fine gentleman – perhaps a Fortune 500 company director – walk up to the first man in line. And he ended up being the first to walk into the elevator. Ironically, I was the tenth in line and all ten – including the gentleman – made it and though the nine of them were bruised at the man’s discourtesy, I was injured.
  1. At 3 pm, when it was not rush hour – and no soul around – the elevators looked tempting. I was hauling a cart full of groceries to take up to my floor. I stepped into the elevator, and when the door was closing, a child, whose footsteps I’d just heard, threw his hand in the narrowing gap of the closing door. The door now opened, and he stood there, holding it for his mother who’d possibly instructed him to while she was still 20 seconds away. When she appeared, she was pushing a stroller with a toddler in it, followed by her another son who was maneuvering a grocery cart double the size of mine. I made space for them which was a mistake. What else could I’ve done since their stroller, the cart, the mother, and her children had crunched me into a corner. I didn’t mind that there was no apology from the lady, but what I did mind was that their floor was the 29th and mine was the 6th; and we’re not discussing streets here. Well, it pained them as much making space for me by exiting at 6th with all their belongings. Once out, I held the door till they were back in the cage. I don’t know why I thanked the lady: I knew it would go unacknowledged.
  1. A genius got into the elevator on the second floor to go down to the first. He’d taken the ascending one, failing to notice the up arrow. The two men who were already in the elevator had stops at 36th and 6th. The man had no choice but whoosh all the way up to the top floor before swooshing back down to his destination. Pointedly, there are four staircase exits on each floor, and only ten counts of steps from second to first; the genius was brawny, too.
  1. In an elevator with six people, we were going down to the first floor. But, before we could exit the first, a lady moved in, pushing the button for a certain floor; she then held the door and said, “Sweetie, come quickly.” She wasn’t an alien, nor did she appear to believe that she was invisible; her Chanel attracting some of the trapped men inside. Since I’d met the Fortune gentleman only a week prior, I wondered if she was the Fortune lady. The two men, including me, who were stuck right behind her, had to wait until the chanelized Romeos exited. And guess what…there entered the Fortune man, alias, her sweetie.

shuffle

Loyal to our very own elevators (Daily Prompt).

Propose a Scale to four elevators in one frame (Photo Challenge).