All About Downtown Street Fair At Grove Street

I was not keen on attending the Annual All About Downtown Street Fair, but my wife insisted, and we did. It was a good decision. Wife’s always right?

On September 16, 2017 – between 12 noon and 8 pm – the street fair returned for its seventh year.

Featuring over a hundred vendors, the fair sold all kinds of products: handmade jewelry, exclusive art works, specialty cuisines from more than a dozen top food trucks in the tri-state area; there were band performances, and fun rides for children. It was reported that in the year 2015, this event brought over 30,000 into Downtown Jersey City. Hope it has crossed that number this time.

When we entered the fair around evening, the crowd was beginning to swell. The day was hot and humid, but the energy was electric.
A mural depicting rough waves, the Statue of Liberty unaffected. Murals and graffiti have come to define Grove Street, bringing the urban city back to life.
Stained glass studio stall – they do stained glass installation, custom fabrication, and restoration. A smiling Bob Marley wants you to know this.
Books, and more books. Do you see Hillary Clinton’s “What Happened
Curious eyes scanning the street of stalls. No running out of options or varieties here…
Except for this, and how rare. A banana pudding sold out stall.
Wife’s always right, and son too is (leaning to his) right.
Orale Mexican kitchen where…
I bought a corn with cheese and mayonnaise.
Pink Floyd and Bob Dylan waited to be picked.
White Birch Candle offered products that are hand poured, 100% soy wax, and dye free; they burn clean (no soot), have 150+ burn time, and always burn even. Ta-da!
Face painting for kids stall, hosted by Jersey City Pediatric Dentistry.
Time to pause and experience some Latino beat.
How about a drink each of Puerto Rican Sangria following the Latino beat.
The men in white sang and entertained – everyone watching them was at least tapping their feet on the ground.
The best part of the fair owned the biggest ad.
At the crack of dusk, the crowd size increased.
Highlight of the evening: Guatemalan street dance with heavy costumes, drums, and ropes.

Any fair we attend, a plate of funnel cake is a must.
One of the rides we did: the three of us sat in a tea cup with a wheel in the middle that we could steer 360 degrees, while the tray carrying all of the cups rotated; whirl within a whirl.
This mural invites your interpretation.
As night approached, this band performed soft melodies.
We ended the fair with a banana boat ice cream – with chocolate, strawberry, pineapple, and walnuts.
This was it.

Pamper yourself (Daily Prompt). Layered is the culture (Photo Challenge).

When Restroom Is Not For Customers

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While I was waiting for my prescription drugs scanning the aisles and passing my time, I heard a commotion. I could figure out from the distance that a pharmacist was in a verbal duel with a customer. I walked toward the pharmacy counter and paused at the edge of an aisle, which was a strategic spot I could source materials from to do this reporting.

Windy outside and my drug pick-up still ten minutes away, and since I was in search of a topic to write on, I listened in to the argument.

The pharmacist and the store manager appeared relaxed on the other side of the counter; the lady customer stood across from them, a few feet away from me. Her voice was shaky as she chastised the pharmacist, asking him to be more sensitive, and that Duane Reade’s reputation might be at stake if he failed to tend to its customers.

Fifteen minutes earlier:

The lady wanted to use the restroom. (Having lived in Newport for years, I knew that the restroom in this Duane Reade wasn’t for customers.) When she’d asked the pharmacist if she could use it, he responded in the negative. When she insisted citing abdominal pain, he said he’d check with the store manager. Ten minutes passed before the manager arrived, and who responded in the affirmative, giving the lady the keys.

After using the restroom, she came out and began to reason with the pharmacist.

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Still standing at the edge of the aisle, my eyes saw Tylenol, nose smelled VapoRub.

She complained that he’d taken a long time to allow her access, that she was an insulin-dependent diabetic who lived 45 minutes away from the pharmacy. The pharmacist, who was relieved that she’d relieved herself, repeated that the restroom wasn’t for customers (his vocal clarity now bathing in confidence). But, her argument as to why the manager had permitted her silenced him. Refusing to surrender, however, the man yelled, at times, which looked fair given the lady was shrieking throughout.

The aisle that I’d made my corner was suddenly buzzing with customers. The narratives in their murmurs were mostly divided.

Upping the ante, the lady protested that if she had fainted in the pharmacy in those ten minutes — if an ambulance had to be called in and she died en route to the hospital (her choking voice surgically removing any melodramatic pretentiousness) — if the law enforcement then questioned the pharmacist, could he justify his decision to deny an insulin-dependent diabetic restroom access?

This terror of a hypothesis whacked a reluctant apology out of him. However, to be fair to the man, most narratives from the aisle agreed that he was not aware of her diabetes.

Now:

Who was right? Who was wrong? Restroom policy? Exception? Who deserved the exception?

I believed the lady. Imagine she fought with him for 30 minutes. She looked educated? Yes, she was howling.

Had she shared her insulin-dependency fact at the start, he might have responded differently. But her illness was private knowledge “rightly” (or should she have revealed it?)

He was following the store policy, and might be more upset with the manager than with the lady. Would the manager have patted his back had he been considerate to the lady?

A pharmacy may look like an extension to a hospital where one can access restroom, but it isn’t. It’s a pharmaceutical corporate from whom the lady expected a little humility.

 

Nudity

Anyone who reads this may blush or giggle, get excited or even scandalized.

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Never been a fan of public nudity but I still visited Gunnison Beach, Sandy Hook, New Jersey. How humans looked strange!

Gunnison Beach is legal and attracts huge crowds in summer. There’s a group called Friends of Gunnison where hundreds of its members are friends in real life. Meaning: they live their city lives and meet socially fully-clothed; and when they hit the beach they’ll sit across from each other – discuss life, family and politics – without a shred of clothing on them.

Weekly Photo Challenge

Bronze Threshold In Battery Park

We know that the immigrants built this country, suffering years and years of toil and struggle. This bronze sculpture in Battery Park celebrates the diversity of New York City.

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The figures with their dramatic poses include a freed African slave, a worker, a priest and an Eastern European Jew. Indeed this was a threshold before the freedom beckoned guaranteeing our rights and responsibilities.

 

 

The Breakers At Rhode Island

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We visited The Breakers in Newport, Rhode Island, more than a year ago. We were two of the 300,000 visitors that year, which is roughly the number of visitors every year.

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The Breakers – a Vanderbilt mansion, a national historic landmark, the most luxuriant house in a summer resort, the top Gilded Age gem, considered the social capital of America – was constructed in 1895.

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Since interior photography wasn’t allowed we couldn’t take pictures, but from what we saw and learned: Italian and African marbles, and mosaics and rare woods from several countries were used to design the interior. Interestingly, the gold room in the mansion was constructed in France before disassembling and shipping the parts in airtight cases to Newport, Rhode Island, where it was re-assembled.

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View from the mansion – oasis of green and blue.

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Steel trusses were used to make the structure fireproof.

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Manneken Pis In Brussels

Though not a great picture, my rendezvous with the legend of Manneken Pis – a 61 cm tall bronze statue – happened a decade ago in Brussels, Belgium. Since the visit to Brussels was around Christmas, you could see him in a Santa Claus costume, peeing into fountain’s basin.

Among the several stories about Manneken Pis, my favorite is, When a fire awoke a young boy, he put out the fire with his urine and therefore could stop the king’s castle from burning down.

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Street Life Inequality

The first thing that comes to mind when I think about street is crowd, and how people in the crowd are either active or inactive. Other things that become part of street may lie in the periphery, adding layers and colors.

People in these pictures are impersonators from two different locations: one, from posh-yet-punishing Los Angeles in the US, and the other, buzzing-yet-backward Santo Domingo in Dominican Republic.

Los Angeles punishes strugglers. Legend has it that Brad Pitt was once an impersonator before he became what he became. Here in the picture, an impersonator has become Robert Pattinson, who looked fit and might not be a hungry man. People were paying him for a picture.313056_10150380572860625_4919311_n

Santo Domingo has a lot of hungry people. The impersonator in the picture, who looked stoned, stood in that position for a long time; the street was empty. But he performed ‘Dangerous’ moves later in the evening as people swarmed the El Conde Street. Michael Jackson later told me that he’d moonwalk all day to eat one meal at night. When I offered him Presidente beer he drank it with his meal, following which he asked me if I wanted to smoke weed.1071355_10151822514175625_2008872921_o

 

 

Character Buildings In New York City

In continuing the series on New York City, this is my third post (firstsecond).

This will take you to the clusters of glass, steel and concrete. The tall buildings of NYC. Capturing them on camera was easy.

Brilliant architecture and lovely designs have infused life into these buildings, giving them character.

Hyatt and Chrysler621360_10151289585220625_2132890286_o

Chrysler Building177675_10151289585395625_999917920_o

Apple Store57395_10151316771850625_1463415113_o

Bank of America Tower171927_10151316773960625_1502696759_o

Freedom TowerIMG_3875

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Some magnificent structuresIMG_3728

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From atop the Empire State: the downtown viewIMG_3046

Midtown and uptown viewDSCN0247

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Bergdorf Goodman 52769_10151316772390625_508349399_o

Time Warner Center415740_10151316766140625_1119920250_o

The Plaza Hotel665979_10151316765520625_1439334392_o

United Nations132815_10151289586985625_179817469_o

Gorgeous skyscrapers172755_10151289584115625_2029968795_o

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Metlife Building176963_10151289584585625_1355493259_o

Rockefeller Plaza398143_10150620599720625_610141746_n

Washington Square Arch200943_10150229688495625_8185752_o

St. Patrick’s Cathedral402441_10150620598770625_1378830332_n

The Empire State11146_216692215624_2278989_n

New York Stock Exchange35331_453780580624_5642733_n

New York Public Library176164_10151289581685625_942165916_o

Citi Building193096_10151289578500625_1557436214_o\

Engravings615611_10151289579355625_755672449_o

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The National Museum of the American Indian 461815_10151193686415625_910738829_o

Grand Central Terminal401070_10150620607595625_987334125_n

(from the inside)IMG_3944

Downtown Manhattan skyline (view from the apartment)IMG_6004

Midtown Manhattan skyline (view from our previous apartment)35379_453780890624_7495325_n

 

Each contributes in New York City

This is in continuation to my post about New York City. It’s a brief list: I’m sharing what my camera chose to capture.

There are several fountains in the city. Each unique and beautiful. Sit nearby, sip coffee, and watch the flow.622774_10151289577975625_1830168443_o

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There are lane signs galore. This one caught my attention: manages the traffic well.56295_10151316754980625_2082077326_o

It’s the city of pigeons, too. When they’re bored on the ground, they have a vantage point.55405_10151316766690625_132147015_o

Drinking fountain – drink and hydrate yourself.177327_10151316755425625_1871769200_o

Though drivers adhere to the speed limit, there are exceptions and fines.334426_10151289590740625_1888029463_o

No free parking that is615409_10151289592615625_1137667108_o

This is important considering how buildings come up thick and fast.334463_10151289576390625_382414106_o

Where heavy trucks seek rejuvenation56487_10151289594425625_1422531215_o

Free and paid. Upgrade yourself.77777_10151289594605625_1918897414_o

Paid and timed. Or fined.622017_10151289589905625_2022720298_o

There’s no dearth of parking garages; supply meets demand.615953_10151289591200625_1747003207_o

See red, and streets and avenues pause.131693_10151289591630625_1672860108_o

Underpass and tunnel ease traffic congestion.456142_10151289587790625_1316764048_o

Quenching the thirst415752_10151316763690625_887944791_o

This is everywhere, keeping the city healthy.54915_10151289594890625_1903161895_o (1)

When art gets public space and attention

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Plenty of chairs. Can’t be tired for long.134036_10151316754635625_19978666_o

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A bus stop waits for engines and hearts.200935_10151289591855625_1225518007_o

Subway entry. Tranquil stairs now.413297_10151289591430625_532724696_o

Wanna call? Have the coins?337165_10151289580085625_1804629126_o

Go round and round, child.175206_10151289589560625_1230927842_o

Time’s everything.415679_10151316773120625_1116823728_o

 

 

 

Great Stirrup Cay In Bahamas

Great Stirrup Cay is a private, 250-acre island in Bahamas, owned by Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL), where we had a great time.

It has crystal clear water and soft white sand beaches. Swim, snorkel, sunbathe; there’s a mini Straw Market for shopping; midday beach-side BBQ for lunch; Hippo water slide: world’s largest inflatable water slide – 40 feet high, 175 feet long.

Lucayan Indians inhabited the island first, then Spanish explorers came, followed by the British. Slave traders were active in the 19th century. The cay was later used during the American Civil War; then as an American base to fight German submarines active in the Caribbean during World War II. And before NCL bought the island from an oil company, the US Air Force used it as a satellite tracking station.

Swim or snorkel beside a school of tropical fish, or get a photo taken with a waiter-in-water.

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Beach chairs may outdo the blue of the sky.204

Lifeguard’s best rock-seat160

Fresh arrivals143

Approaching the cay021

Coconut palm – the common treeaa

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Soft white sand beaches207

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The mini Straw Marketcc (1)

Calm ocean breeze adds to the funii (1)

Hammock-ing relaxes

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Hippo Water Slideii (2)

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Dusk’s approaching the island224